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motherhood

BREAKING: Dads Can Receive Emails and Make Decisions Too!

Upydeeh Day School* is reeling this week after a mom emailed the principal with shocking news that her son’s father can also receive emails and make decisions.

How One Conversation With My Mom Shaped My Parenting

There is a popular adage that says, “Never judge someone by the opinion of others.” While my mom didn’t say these exact words, I can still remember the conversation when she imparted this wisdom.

Sometimes You Can’t Walk It Off

I stepped funny before school drop off—I was probably doing and thinking of a thousand different things at the time, in that way that anyone who has ever gotten a kid off to school...

Parenting is Not an Innate Ability

Parenting is not an innate ability. It does not live in all of us and then magically presents itself the day our children are born.

Sometimes it’s Just Easier to Do It Myself

My husband is a perfectly capable human being. Completely. Given a to-do list, he will do anything I ask him to. But sometimes, it’s easier to do it myself.

The Sixth Stage of Grief: Fear that It Will Happen Again

We all know the stages of grief—denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. I’ve been through them...and added a sixth stage—fear.

Coparenting After Divorce: Learning To Co-Parent Alone

The word co-parenting is a lie. In my experience, co-parenting doesn’t always mean two people working together. In our house, for a long time, co-parenting meant one person working alone.

Ten Things You Need to Know About Motherhood

As new mothers, we all want to know the secret that all the other good moms seem to know. Here are ten tips that will help you, mama.

Seeing the Forest Through the Trees: Life with Toddlers

I hear that three and a half is magical, and that children turn the corner from beast to beauty, but I’m still waiting...

Parenting a Child with Invisible Special Needs

I hear all the time how “normal” my son seems and looks of surprise when people meet him. I worry about him because his special needs are almost invisible.